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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While the question may seem weird, think of it this way.

I got my 2016 F5 in October 2016. It is production date is August 2015. So it was filled with oil at that time, right?

Hence, in order to comply with the manual, you must change oil within 6 months... Therefore, it is past due by about two oil changes. Would you need to change the oil right away then?
It would not really make sense, but then on the other hand 6 months is 6 months.

The other question.
Does anyone know for sure what oil was used with the factory fill?

Was it 5W-30 or 5W-40? Also, was it mineral or synthetic?
Mineral is better for the initial break in... so if I am planning on changing it at 1000 miles, I would rather stick into what OEM used.
 

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I've asked kia techs and no one I've spoken with can tell me what kind of oil comes in from the factory. They also will put in conventional in any new car too so there's that...

when I bought my car it was about 400 days old from the factory. I waited until 3k to do my first change then 5k after. at that time I was driving mostly hwy about 2 to 3k miles a month.
I broke it in hard basically right away. after about 1k miles I was WOT to red line. Idk if that matters but I wanted to try a hard break in and see what happens. 24k on her now oil looks good after 5k and doesn't stink like gas.
 

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Can't really answer your question regarding what fill comes from the factory, but I would imagine it to be a conventional (maybe a blend) 5w30. The manuals recommended oil is the TOTAL brand.. they make both syn and conventional.

Without the car being driven you wouldn't have to worry about fuel dilution.

And I don't know where I heard this, but I've always assumed that oil has a shelf life of 2 years once opened... Maybe it was my old shop teacher I don't know. Since then that's what I've followed.

I would make it to 1000 miles and change to full synthetic. Atleast, that's what I did.

Oh and the warranty starts on the day you take ownership, not the build date of the car. So with the car technically missing 2 oil changes, it wasn't in your possession so they couldn't deny you for that. It would just be from when you started to drive the car.
 

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I guarantee its a 5w30 conventional variant. As to what brand, it would be truly difficult to ascertain. It would depend on point of final assembly. Notably that would be in Korea. The cars are final assembled filled with fluids there ran, driven onto large container transports. I guarantee the oil is a Korean subsidiary of,...who knows what company.

As far as dealerships in the uSA, Hyundai/Kia negotiate this intermittently. We know from TSB's in Hyun/KIA for the 1.6 T-GDI they are recommending 5w30/5w40 in hotter climates conditions.
As long as the oil meets the necessary ratings manufacterer is really not important.

The 1000 mile change is a good idea. The conventional oil allows for break in, then you remove all the excess sealants/particles of metal etc that all new engines will have.
I used MOTUL at 1000, put in by my dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the response.

The time count was only up for a discussion. Of course not driven car would not dilute oil. That is simple.
However, the manual states the oil changes to be EITHER 6 months or 5000 miles. Hence I thought if the car was initially filled in August 2015 then, regardless of being driven only for say 10 miles, oil would need to be changed in February...

Just like now when I have the car - say I drive it only occasionally on distance of 50 miles, twice a week, so over 6 months that is only 2600 miles... yet oil should be changed.

Do not take it so seriously...
Again, just kind of thinking out loud how it should or should not work.

Would oil age so much? It is kind of open container, although dirt does not get in.
I know, I know...



As for the fill-up oil.

As I suspected - they would not pour synthetic. One thing is break in (synthetic will not glaze cylinders - I do not remember exactly how it was going/what are the terms in English - anyway, synthetic would not provide enough lubrication on the cylinders, it would drain quickly).
Shall I put mineral for the remaining 2000 miles?
 

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Feel free to correct me for a wrong response but idk where but through discussions I have read that cars don't need a "break in period" from the factory. I've built an engine before completely and of course I had break in oil with correct zinc and other additives that I don't care to remember but for new engines to me it seems odd that there would be no break in period at all. But that is what I have been told through the grape vine or whatever.

Could manufacturers actually build an engine that doesn't require a special oil for break in and if they don't, why don't they make it a big deal when you buy a new car? I know they say in the book to change it a little early but that's it. I have had hundreds of hours of kia training for product knowledge but never can I get specific answers like this.

We should be told that you need to drive a certain way to break in your car if that is what would allow you do have a better performing/longer lasting car.

I remember in car say from the 90's they stated for the break in period that you should drive easy and not use cruise for any extended amount of time. But not now.

And please feel free to correct me this is all just of the top of my brain but I just thought I would toss out a bit of discussion out here.
 

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Youre right. Motors are much improved.

It was conveyed to me by a much wise SME to do a change at 1,000 to merely remove the side effects of "manufacter" if nothing else.
 

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Yeah every new car I've seen says that the break-in procedures aren't really needed anymore as they were done at the factory - or so it is claimed. Our manual says no special procedure is required, but is recommend to not do the same things you mentioned above.

For me it's just piece of mind, doing a "2nd" break in just makes me feel better :)

I also made my father do it on his 2015 Ram haha, and my mother wants to get a new vehicle so I'll make sure she does it too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The manual says to be "gentle" with the car for the first 600 miles, although says no "special break-in" is needed.
Then again, they say keep RPM between 2k and 4k, no towing for 1200 miles...


Sure, I completely agree - nowadays engines are made much better. Their specs are much tighter and fitment is much better than 30 years ago. However, they still need break-in. Even if you make make tolerances within 0.02 mm there is still some variation that will wear/even out.
The thing is that the several hundred of hours of the initial working time of you engine will produce more heat, more friction (more wear due to uneven surfaces) so you do not want to race it too much to not create local overheating...

Oil? I am not sure, but I do remember conventional oil is a must for a new engine or rebuilt one, especially when cylinders were honed.

Also, see here:
 

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but I've always assumed that oil has a shelf life of 2 years once opened... Maybe it was my old shop teacher I don't know. Since then that's what I've followed.
.
You've got to be JOKING. Motor oil NEVER looses it's lubricating property, just gets dirty- it can be cleaned and recycled over and over. Shelf life doesn't enter into it. Manufacturers want you to buy their newest formulations and tell you such things.
 

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Meh heard it somewhere from someone I knew and went with it. Wouldn't normally have an opened bottle of oil that I wouldn't use with 2 years anyway, if I did I would probably use it in my lawnmower/snowblower or other piece of equipment. Since I keep it in my garage, it would be exposed to +30 and then -30, and once opened moisture can get it... I dunno, just something I follow and will continue to follow. Oil is cheap
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You've got to be JOKING. Motor oil NEVER looses it's lubricating property, just gets dirty- it can be cleaned and recycled over and over. Shelf life doesn't enter into it. Manufacturers want you to buy their newest formulations and tell you such things.
Not so easy....

Special formulations and additives makes the oil meet multigrade specification.

Sure, lubrication itself is never lost, but it will not meet say 5W-40 grade anymore. After a while it may become 10W-50, or 10W-30 as the polymers will break down due to oxidation.


When you are talking crude oil - it still changes, even though not as much. It is millions years old, but once exposed to oxygen and moisture - degradation will start. Almost every chemical has its "half-life"... The changes might be minimal, but will happen.

Yet, fresh oil, just sitting on the shelf will be fine for a few years. How long? Who knows...


On a side note.
Even water would lubricate the engine good enough to keep it running. Problem is evaporation. But as long as water flows, it will work. :)
 

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Sure, lubrication itself is never lost, but it will not meet say 5W-40 grade anymore. After a while it may become 10W-50, or 10W-30 as the polymers will break down due to oxidation.

WHAT??? You're suggesting the oil transforms itself into a different grade or viscosity? Where did you come up with that?



:)
This thread is full of wives tales and internet lore. As bad as synthetic oil causing engine leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
This thread is full of wives tales and internet lore. As bad as synthetic oil causing engine leaks.
Did you ever do oil analysis?
That is a natural process of aging of oil. Yes, it does. Just like petrol sitting in the tank will get worse after weeks. Oil takes more time, but will do it.
read here (public access)
http://www.ac2t.at/fileadmin/Dokume...schaftlich/Poster_wissenschaftlich_LUB_02.pdf

or here (if oyu do have access)

Engine oil ageing under laboratory conditions - Vipper - 2002 - Lubrication Science - Wiley Online Library

or some here:
Oil Degradation

or even here:

The Influence of Oil Ageing on the Change of Viscosity and Lubricity of Engine Oil


All of them say viscosity will change, new chemicals are formed, and the role of additives is crucial in helping to slow down the aging (or ageing if you like), but does not stop it. At some point they will be consumed and the process accelerates.



As bad as synthetic oil causing engine leaks.
Funny thing, but it does.
In an old engine, with lots of burned oil and old type of seals, where mineral oil changes were neglected and/or oil was improper weight, a good synthetic with good cleaning additives will start washing them down. As a result compression may drop, oil pressure may drop (that is not bad as lower pressure may mean better flow...), and seals/gaskets may start to leak.
 

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PLP with the links, I never have to look up anything you just post em up for me ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
PLP with the links, I never have to look up anything you just post em up for me ;)
I tend to rather shut up if I cannot support my statement...

Just like 6th said somewhere:

......
.....
It is very rarely I get a reply with actual factual information with citations and actual work.
.....
.....
So I do not like hearing "oh yeah, it will be fine"... I want to hear facts supporting this statement.
Still, those articles are not conclusive, at leas not to me. But at least they shine some light, as in empirical data, on the topic.
Otherwise we talk about HID vs LED - "you know, LED seems to be much brighter, so I like it more than HID"... completely useless statement.
 

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I tend to rather shut up if I cannot support my statement...

Just like 6th said somewhere:



So I do not like hearing "oh yeah, it will be fine"... I want to hear facts supporting this statement.
Still, those articles are not conclusive, at leas not to me. But at least they shine some light, as in empirical data, on the topic.
Otherwise we talk about HID vs LED - "you know, LED seems to be much brighter, so I like it more than HID"... completely useless statement.
I usually just say nonsense so my bad lol but I do appreciate the facts or quality post instead of just opinion

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
 

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Did you ever do oil analysis?
That is a natural process of aging of oil. Yes, it does. Just like petrol sitting in the tank will get worse after weeks. Oil takes more time, but will do it.
read here (public access)
http://www.ac2t.at/fileadmin/Dokume...schaftlich/Poster_wissenschaftlich_LUB_02.pdf

or here (if oyu do have access)

Engine oil ageing under laboratory conditions - Vipper - 2002 - Lubrication Science - Wiley Online Library

or some here:
Oil Degradation

or even here:

The Influence of Oil Ageing on the Change of Viscosity and Lubricity of Engine Oil


All of them say viscosity will change, new chemicals are formed, and the role of additives is crucial in helping to slow down the aging (or ageing if you like), but does not stop it. At some point they will be consumed and the process accelerates.





Funny thing, but it does.
In an old engine, with lots of burned oil and old type of seals, where mineral oil changes were neglected and/or oil was improper weight, a good synthetic with good cleaning additives will start washing them down. As a result compression may drop, oil pressure may drop (that is not bad as lower pressure may mean better flow...), and seals/gaskets may start to leak.
Anyone can get on the internet and post links - GAWD. Doesn't make it factual.
 

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It was a purposefully vague statement, but it is true in a manner of speaking.

Synthetic oil causing leaks ? PLP is correct.

Here's how it MIGHT contribute over time:

A full PAO based synthtic softens some seals. Possibly causing a loss of rigidity.
A full ester hardens some seals. Possibly causing them to become brittle, and yes potentially leak.

Mix the two. Come up wth a neutral combination. Seals remain the same, at least from chemical ph point of view.
My source is the inventor of CERMA. He mixes his pure synthetics this way.

The only sure things in life are DEATH TAXES and arguments in OIL THREADS!!!! LOL:p
 
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