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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes, I heard of it several times. But mostly it was to keep temperature down in the engine bay.

But I came across this video supported by evidence from this study (link below the video)


https://repositories.lib.utexas.edu/handle/2152/43718

And I am a bit wondering how much that would be true in our cars.

Has anyone ever put a blanket? If so, what size is our compressor? I did not find a blanket that would be direct fit, but there are dozens of cheapo for T3/T4 (whatever that means).
Any advice?
 

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Saw that video before and was wondering too. I think I read at VT that blanket for K04 might fit and it's about $250. Also that our turbo is too small to see any big changes, plus putting that blanket would be a pain.

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Small turbos will not benefit (generally speaking) from a turbo blanket or a wrap - or more precisely - the other components in the engine won't be affected or melted by the heat from our OEM turbos. Whereas in some large HP, fuel guzzling, large exhaust situations, race applications - the turbo can get red hot putting other engine components at risk for fire, melting, leaking, cracking etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
putting that blanket would be a pain.
I know that... access is basically none and mainly from underneath.


Also that our turbo is too small to see any big changes
Small turbos will not benefit
When I think of it more, I would say the smaller turbo, the more it may see a difference. More below.

the other components in the engine won't be affected or melted by the heat from our OEM turbos. Whereas in some large HP, fuel guzzling, large exhaust situations, race applications - the turbo can get red hot putting other engine components at risk for fire, melting, leaking, cracking etc.
It is not exactly like that...
The idea of heat blanket is to keep the heat inside the turbo. BUT this is not to keep heat from the other components (that is only a side effect).

Something I did not realise until reading the article. Actually, a thesis.

Some intro and basic info.
In plain words - compressor is made of metal, right?
Turbine is propelled by exhaust gases. The faster it spools, the more air it will push (or build pressure).
So the more gases you pass through, the faster the spin.
We are all good here, right?

Now, the main issue.
Exhaust gases pass through the propeller and exit to the exhaust pipe.
Since the whole turbo casing is made of metal, it conducts heat. And it does it very well. Hence, we see the very hot engine bay.
And this is bad for the pressure. You do not want any heat losses there.

A bit of physics.
Very hot and quite compressed exhaust gasses escape the cylinder. They decompress when coming to turbo. You would like to have them follow adiabatic decompression (i.e. ideal decompression - no heat losses, no gas leaks). Of course that does not happen.
As you know, any gas is very sensitive to temperature change. Any temperature drop causes sudden volume change.
Hence, the hotter the exhaust gasses, the more volume will pass the turbine. The more you let them go through, the better the output (response/compression).

In very short - cooling off exhaust gases in the compressor, makes it less efficient. Adding a blanket, you keep the heat from escaping, hence there is less cooling to the exhaust, meaning more volume flowing through the turbo.


We have very small engine and quite small turbo.
1.6 displacement does not pump so much exhaust, so if you cool it down in "colder" turbo, you lose the extra volume.

Here is the trick though.
Adding the blanket will NOT create more power. You only get the power quicker. They say, for this huge turbo, you are about 250 rpm ahead. That means, the turbo spool is quicker and with the blanket you get the power sooner than before (250 rpm sooner).
So if you push the gas at low rpm, you will receive faster response.

If I could monitor the shaft speed, I would be able to see change in my car... as I think I will give it a try.


Sorry for long post.
 

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True, same like wrapping headers in N/A applications help to evacuate gasses quicker from engine. Also good side effect, reduced engine bay temp.
About quicker turbo spool I'm going to try cerma treatment.

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