Kia Forte Turbo Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I have a Koup 2015 SX. I'm looking to give it a nice drop. I'm between putting coilovers or springs. I understand the differences between both and that with coilovers I have more freedom to drop the car and they are a more complete system. Now, I don't want to drop the car fully (wheels and tires inside the over fender). I want to give it a nice drop and leave some gap in the tires so I don't have problems with speed bumps since I have to deal with many of those in the parking lot of my work and where I live. I know that there are the Storm springs (I'm also in budgeting) which they can put around 1.45 inches in the drop. They are cheaper, but I need to use the stock shocks. My question is, what would be the best in my point of view? If I go with springs, will the drop will be noticable enough but comfortable and won't affect the shocks? Would I need to change the stock shocks in less than a year? How does these looks in the Koup? Are they are noticable compared with the stock springs in the Koup? Or would you recommend going coil overs? And If I go coild overs, which ones do you recommend? Also, how much to drop it do you recommend in the coilovers?

Thanks for your time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
I'd go with coilers since it's the 'proper' way to do it. At stock height I'm already pretty low and going over speed bumps and pot holes really reminds me I need to take it easy. Already bent my sheered and bent my winter setup but the truth is, I'm a fucking idiot when I drive. I don't take enough care of my ride. Just got new wheels about 3 weeks ago and if I go inspect them I'm pretty sure I have some curb rash. The first week after getting them I was pretty self conscious about pot holes and such but the amount of times I've gone over pot holes and felt a big jolt exceeds the fingers on my hand.

I find the stock suspension on the Forte5 to be pretty hard but also too much give when cornering aggressively so I'm lead to believe coil overs and/or lowering springs will help this tremendously and 'because race car'.

Seriously, I want to lower the car, get racing seats, may be even do aftermarket steering wheel with a quick release, a dog box transmission and anti-lag, big 'fuck-off' turbo eventually.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'd go with coilers since it's the 'proper' way to do it. At stock height I'm already pretty low and going over speed bumps and pot holes really reminds me I need to take it easy. Already bent my sheered and bent my winter setup but the truth is, I'm a fucking idiot when I drive. I don't take enough care of my ride. Just got new wheels about 3 weeks ago and if I go inspect them I'm pretty sure I have some curb rash. The first week after getting them I was pretty self conscious about pot holes and such but the amount of times I've gone over pot holes and felt a big jolt exceeds the fingers on my hand.

I find the stock suspension on the Forte5 to be pretty hard but also too much give when cornering aggressively so I'm lead to believe coil overs and/or lowering springs will help this tremendously and 'because race car'.

Seriously, I want to lower the car, get racing seats, may be even do aftermarket steering wheel with a quick release, a dog box transmission and anti-lag, big 'fuck-off' turbo eventually.

I think the heigh of the Forte5 is different compared with the Koup. The Koup is higher like .5 inches to 1 (someone can correct me on this). If I had the 5 I won't drop it, but just add the torsion bar. But I prefer the look of the Koup.

I also forgot to mention that I drive at most 20 miles daily.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
359 Posts
If you're just looking for a "look" springs will do fine and cost alot less. Coilovers are great as they can be adjusted in different ways (height, dampening, ect.) Biggest problem with coilovers and 2nd Gen forte is there arent any readily available options out there for you. We've been getting reports that some of the Veloster suspension components including coilovers work on the 2nd gen Forte with small modification.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
981 Posts
If you're just looking for a "look" springs will do fine and cost alot less. Coilovers are great as they can be adjusted in different ways (height, dampening, ect.) Biggest problem with coilovers and 2nd Gen forte is there arent any readily available options out there for you. We've been getting reports that some of the Veloster suspension components including coilovers work on the 2nd gen Forte with small modification.
BC Racing has a kit designed on and for the 2nd Gen Forte and can be ordered directly from them or I do think we have a vendor on here that has the kits available.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
359 Posts
BC Racing has a kit designed on and for the 2nd Gen Forte and can be ordered directly from them or I do think we have a vendor on here that has the kits available.
Correct, they are made to order still I believe so they dont have them in stock and you have to wait a few weeks for delivery. We happen to be one of those vendors if you'd like to go through us for a set just send me an email [email protected]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Correct, they are made to order still I believe so they dont have them in stock and you have to wait a few weeks for delivery. We happen to be one of those vendors if you'd like to go through us for a set just send me an email [email protected]
I will consider the springs over the coilovers. I saw the drop in another thread and looks good, not too low neither too high. I need to take some measurments and make sure what I really want to achieve. If I go with springs I'll start with the stock shocks and when they die I'll put some performance shocks. There still like 1 more year to do the project, but I'm doing bugeting now to calculate how much I will pay for everything.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
294 Posts
I have made this post many times, but it is definitely a good one for people to read and see what fits them best.

Springs are good for a decent drop, and relatively cheap, usually around $300 give or take. BUT they WILL wear out the stock struts at a significantly higher rate than normal. Your stock struts are designed to work within a optimum range (stock height) when you put lowering springs on these struts, this takes them out of this range they are supposed to be operating in. Last I checked, stock struts were somewhere around $300(ish) a piece. I believe they are more, but lets just use $300 for reference. Stock struts which under normal operating conditions, and being used in their optimum range would be good for 100k+ miles (give or take) now, you can take that and cut it in half, or less. So now you are looking at $1200 for replacing your struts at 50k miles. on top of the $300(again ish) for your springs you have already bought, looking at a grand total of $1500. You can get a good set of coilovers, from a reputable company for $1000. Lets say some freak thing happens, and you blow out all 4 coilovers, a rebuild kit is $100 per corner you are up to $1400 and they have lasted you 2-3 times longer than these lowering springs.

Now that we have covered initial cost, and maintenance, lets talk about performance. Springs will come in at a higher spring rate than stock, yes performance (handling) will be increased from this, but this will be slightly, as you still have your spongy stock struts. Coilovers, which one, are built to have a much broader optimum range than stock suspension, as well as in most cases fully adjustable dampening AND height. This means, you can drop your car 2 inches, too much, raise it up a half inch, not enough? drop it down another half inch, you can adjust height, pre-load, dampening, as well as corner balance the vehicle for optimum performance. Yes, coilovers are 3x the price of springs, but given maintenance costs, the fact that the performance is immensely better, I would save your money, and get the better option. It may be tempting to sacrifice quality for cost, but when you look at the long term, quality will save you money.

Please let me know if anyone has any questions or comments regarding this post, as I am more than happy to respond!
Have a great day everyone!
Tyson.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have made this post many times, but it is definitely a good one for people to read and see what fits them best.

Springs are good for a decent drop, and relatively cheap, usually around $300 give or take. BUT they WILL wear out the stock struts at a significantly higher rate than normal. Your stock struts are designed to work within a optimum range (stock height) when you put lowering springs on these struts, this takes them out of this range they are supposed to be operating in. Last I checked, stock struts were somewhere around $300(ish) a piece. I believe they are more, but lets just use $300 for reference. Stock struts which under normal operating conditions, and being used in their optimum range would be good for 100k+ miles (give or take) now, you can take that and cut it in half, or less. So now you are looking at $1200 for replacing your struts at 50k miles. on top of the $300(again ish) for your springs you have already bought, looking at a grand total of $1500. You can get a good set of coilovers, from a reputable company for $1000. Lets say some freak thing happens, and you blow out all 4 coilovers, a rebuild kit is $100 per corner you are up to $1400 and they have lasted you 2-3 times longer than these lowering springs.

Now that we have covered initial cost, and maintenance, lets talk about performance. Springs will come in at a higher spring rate than stock, yes performance (handling) will be increased from this, but this will be slightly, as you still have your spongy stock struts. Coilovers, which one, are built to have a much broader optimum range than stock suspension, as well as in most cases fully adjustable dampening AND height. This means, you can drop your car 2 inches, too much, raise it up a half inch, not enough? drop it down another half inch, you can adjust height, pre-load, dampening, as well as corner balance the vehicle for optimum performance. Yes, coilovers are 3x the price of springs, but given maintenance costs, the fact that the performance is immensely better, I would save your money, and get the better option. It may be tempting to sacrifice quality for cost, but when you look at the long term, quality will save you money.

Please let me know if anyone has any questions or comments regarding this post, as I am more than happy to respond!
Have a great day everyone!
Tyson.

Thanks for this update. It is great to have an opinion with the possible side effects in the future, and not only with the features of coilovers. I'm looking at springs because currently I drive around 10-20 miles per day, yet I pass through some speed bumps (a lot of them) in my job parking lot. Although the distance is short, the speed bumps will eventually wear the shocks. I think your point is do it right or do it twice.

Which coild overs for the Forte Koup do you recommend?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
294 Posts
Thanks for this update. It is great to have an opinion with the possible side effects in the future, and not only with the features of coilovers. I'm looking at springs because currently I drive around 10-20 miles per day, yet I pass through some speed bumps (a lot of them) in my job parking lot. Although the distance is short, the speed bumps will eventually wear the shocks. I think your point is do it right or do it twice.

Which coild overs for the Forte Koup do you recommend?
I would have to look at what options there are out there. What year is yours? I always suggest BC Racing to the daily driver people, they are a more affordable option than most, but do not sacrifice quality. You can get a set of "coilovers" for like $400 but id never suggest those. They do not have dampening adjustment. If you are someone who tracks your car often, id suggest a more track oriented coilover, but BC is the way to go for a daily driver that see's spirited driving.
Tyson
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
359 Posts
Thanks for this update. It is great to have an opinion with the possible side effects in the future, and not only with the features of coilovers. I'm looking at springs because currently I drive around 10-20 miles per day, yet I pass through some speed bumps (a lot of them) in my job parking lot. Although the distance is short, the speed bumps will eventually wear the shocks. I think your point is do it right or do it twice.

Which coild overs for the Forte Koup do you recommend?
I'm pretty sure BC coilovers are really the only option right now for the 2nd gen forte other than modified Veloster coilovers. I know ARK performance just came out with a new set of springs for the 2nd gen Forte, maybe they are working on a set of coilovers as well? Not sure but we'll be sure to let you and the community know when any new options are available
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I would have to look at what options there are out there. What year is yours? I always suggest BC Racing to the daily driver people, they are a more affordable option than most, but do not sacrifice quality. You can get a set of "coilovers" for like $400 but id never suggest those. They do not have dampening adjustment. If you are someone who tracks your car often, id suggest a more track oriented coilover, but BC is the way to go for a daily driver that see's spirited driving.
Tyson
Hi Tyson,

Mine is 2015. I think BC makes them but by order. I don't think they mass produce them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
48 Posts
Megan racing has released their new EZ series coilovers for the second generation Forte models.

We just added them to the website andhave five sets of them in stock currently.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top