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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all,
Just thought that with daylight saving time about to end and the first frosts about to occur in many of the northern regions I would place a quick reminder to start checking your oil catch cans more frequently and empty them completely every time.
Having a OCC is a great preventative measure to help keep your valves and intake cleaner for longer, however this come with the very real risk of blowing seals unless you stay on top of checking them.
Quick rule of thumb before we delve deeper - If you have condensation on your windows that has frozen, you need to check and empty your can!

Here is the rationale with a quick and dirty (pun intended) reason why you need a catch can in the first place:
The PCV (positive crankcase ventilation) system is critical to proper engine performance. It is designed to keep your motor from seeing pressure that will put stress on the seals where it is not supposed to be. This pressure is caused by what is known as blow by (air, fuel, water, and oil that makes it past the piston seals) the PCV system is designed to vent blowby oil, water, and fuel, and recirculate it back to the intake manifold to be reburned by the engine to prevent it from being released directly into the environment, this is an emissions improving measure.
Unfortunately by doing so it can very rapidly increase buildup on our valves, hence the reason many of us are using oil catch cans.

During the colder months (below frost point) water in the PCV system re-condenses very rapidly as it exits the hot engine into the cooler low pressure region of of the recirculation hose/oil catch can. once it re-condenses into a pool of liquid and the engine cools down while turned off, this water/oil/fuel mixture can freeze thereby plugging up your PCV line, valve, and oil catch can. The primary concern is that the water component of this mixture can accumulate at a very fast rate when the weather is cold. For instance during the summer months I can easily manage to go a month between draining my can and collect less than 30ml of fluid. during the winter months I can collect that same amount in less than a week due to the increased condensation. Think of it as the same thing as having your windows fogged up/covered with ice, in the winter if you don't do something about it, you WILL crash eventually.

A plugged oil catch can will not vent your crankcase properly and will increase your crankcase pressures. Eventually your seals will blow and you will have a huge and very expensive problem, also by definition you will be left stranded out in the cold.
Don't let this be you!
Check your catch can(s).

The easiest interval for checking your cans are every time you fill up at the gas station, for some regions and conditions this may still not be enough. Check frequently to determine the required interval for your region, conditions, and fuel.
Additionally, the best time to empty your can is once the engine has warmed up and melted the ice back into liquid form, but not if it is close to reaching the top of the can, in this case take the extra effort to remove the ice asap.

-Dennis
 

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Where is it appropriate to empty that nasty fluid? Trash can?
Empty oil bottle works like a champ, I added a fitting to the bottom of the can and ran a hose down with a on/off valve so while changing the oil I can just turn the valve and drain the can into the drain pan. This car is also in the south and has little chance of seeing freezing temps low enough to freeze condensation mixed with oil so this method for draining might not be for everyone (or anyone else lol).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Keep accidentally deleting my replies :(

Dispose of it with your waste oil. Anywhere that does oil changes is required to collect and recycle oil. Also don't keep the stuff around, it is really noxious.I empty mine at the location that accepts used oil right there next to the bin (looks like a dumpster), luckily I don't have to go far, my local gas station does oil changes.

Playwithmymind and I both have the no muss/fuss way of draining our cans. Here is a video I posted last winter. I still open the can every so often just to make sure that the isnt a puck of ice forming inside the can.
 

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Still awaiting delivery for my Forte, but I've been looking at different catch cans to get.

It'll be interesting to see if it'll freeze, and judging by all the other threads on other forums the chances are very high. Especially since I live in Ontario where the temps can reach -30ºC - sometimes cooler. I'll have to mount it as close to the exhaust manifold or other heat source... that or just choose not to run a catch can in the winter.

Don't like the idea of seeing my valves after a few winters.
 

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If you get enough build up to actually cause a problem would Kia warranty a cleaning or is that just considered wear and tear?
 

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Check the owners manual and see if there is anything around this type of cleaning.

I am almost certain it would just be another scheduled service... If you did it and have problems - you're covered.

If you didn't, BAM warranty denied.

Just a guess though :)
 

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Interesting. Maybe the cleaning is one of those services only performed if the customer complains... Lack of power or fuel economy or something.

If that's the case, you should be covered until the warranty runs out!
 

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What model of can do you guys have? It looks like you ran a hose down through the engine bay and fastened it somewhere logical underneath for ease of emptying?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a Moroso Universal catch can that comes pre-fitted with the drain valve, but unless you want to do your own mount fabricating I would just go with 6th element's.
His comes with mounting brackets and instructions. I had to make my own mounting bracket and that took several attempts with angle aluminium, angle grinder, drills, a bench vise and some rubberized foam padding to find the right mounting design and location. All in all it was a giant PITA, this was before 6th released his design.
At this point if I had to do it all over again I would buy from 6th and buy a mini ball valve, a rubber washer, and the right size nut to hold it all together. Just drill out the bottom of the catch can and fit the ball valve, then run some hose from the valve to underneath your car. there are plenty of precut openings that you can snake it through to keep a stock appearance.
 
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