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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so here is a little write up on how to do a Trunk Brace. It was incredibly easy and I think anyone can get this done with these instructions.

Ok first thing you need to remove is the cover that hides the child seat anchors. This exposes the 4 Phillips head screws holding down the cargo tray.
2016-05-12_15.21.35.jpg

Remove the 4 screws in the cargo tray and pull the tray out. You will now be able to see the bolts holding the left and right child seat anchor.
2016-05-12_15.22.46.jpg

Use a 10mm socket to remove the bolt holding down the brackets. Set the 2 bolts aside with their washers to be used to secure the brace.
2016-05-12_15.26.03.jpg

I decided to just mirror the hole and make it a square. That made it easy to just eyeball. I used a cheap knockoff Dremel and buzzed out the material that was in the way of the holes.
20160512_151320.jpg

Finally align the holes on the trunk brace with the holes in the cat and replace the bolts you took out. I put the paper washers back under the bar to keep it from rubbing.
20160512_151453.jpg

I hope this is useful. I am enjoying doing these. As always, feel free to add to the write up.
 

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How about a review of how it changed the drive? Imagine it's not as dramatic as the rear torsion bar.
 

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I'm sorry but some people will really just buy anything. There is no suspension components, shock mounts or springs anywhere near the location of where that bar bolts in and if the chassis was flexing enough for that bar to make a difference you would have bigger issues. It's just that old placebo affect making you think you notice a difference. It is bolted to two nuts spot welded in sheet metal nothing more. If our car were equipped with a IRS with struts in the rear then yes a trunk brace would have a benefit if it was supporting something. Our rear suspension has 2 points of attachment to the car and even if you installed a 8 point roll cage you couldn't stop the flex in the rear axle, it's in the axle not the chassis.

Just to see if there was any excessive flex (Koup) we set up a bar with a bracket welded to each end that bolted to the outer seat belt bolts (which is the closest point to rear axle mounts from inside the car) then added a second bracket to the 2 bolt holes that hold the rear seat in. After everything was tight the bar was cut in half and we attached a gauge (for reading rotor warp) to one side and put the needle touching the other half with .050" preload. Set the gauge to zero along with the min/max needles and drove like we were at the track. Most we could get was .004" of movement in each direction so a total of .008" and that was only after going over a large speed bump diagonally. Front strut towers were next on the list to check but it didn't make it that far.

Best thing you could do is install the rear torsion bar, it would be a better investment (will not work with coilovers)
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I must say I don't notice any difference in the way my car handles... I figured it would help with body flex during cornering. I might notice it more if I go up the peak.
 

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I'm sorry but some people will really just buy anything. There is no suspension components, shock mounts or springs anywhere near the location of where that bar bolts in and if the chassis was flexing enough for that bar to make a difference you would have bigger issues. It's just that old placebo affect making you think you notice a difference. It is bolted to two nuts spot welded in sheet metal nothing more. If our car were equipped with a IRS with struts in the rear then yes a trunk brace would have a benefit if it was supporting something. Our rear suspension has 2 points of attachment to the car and even if you installed a 8 point roll cage you couldn't stop the flex in the rear axle, it's in the axle not the chassis.

Just to see if there was any excessive flex (Koup) we set up a bar with a bracket welded to each end that bolted to the outer seat belt bolts (which is the closest point to rear axle mounts from inside the car) then added a second bracket to the 2 bolt holes that hold the rear seat in. After everything was tight the bar was cut in half and we attached a gauge (for reading rotor warp) to one side and put the needle touching the other half with .050" preload. Set the gauge to zero along with the min/max needles and drove like we were at the track. Most we could get was .004" of movement in each direction so a total of .008" and that was only after going over a large speed bump diagonally. Front strut towers were next on the list to check but it didn't make it that far.

Best thing you could do is install the rear torsion bar, it would be a better investment (will not work with coilovers)
Once again big thanks for the info which helps all of us. :)
 

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Yep. I installed the rear torsion bar and decide not to get the trunk brace..

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